Home » Revolutionary Services and Civil Life of General William Hull by Maria Campbell
Revolutionary Services and Civil Life of General William Hull Maria Campbell

Revolutionary Services and Civil Life of General William Hull

Maria Campbell

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230271590
Paperback
108 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1848 edition. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER n. War OfMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1848 edition. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER n. War Of 1812.--Governor Hull Affointed Brigadier, general To Lead The Troofs From Ohio To Detroit.--March To Detroit.--Invasion Of Canada.--Fall Of Michilimackinac, And Subsequent Events. In February, 1812, Governor Hull being at Washington, received accounts from the Territory of Michigan, that the Indians were becoming hostile to the defenceless inhabitants of that exposed frontier.* He urged upon the administration the expediency of providing a force for their protection. War with Great Britain was imminent: Congress was augmenting thearmy, and messages had been sent by the British officers in Canada to all the powerful tribes of the Northwest- accompanied with presents of arms or clothing, urging them to take part with Great Britain, their natural ally. Accordingly, the President called upon the Governor of Ohio to detach twelve hundred militia, and prepare them for actual service. These militia were to be joined by the 4th United States regiment, then at Post St. Vincennes. After these arrangements were made, the Secretary of War, Mr. Eustis, stated to Governor Hull, that it was the wish of the President to appoint him to the command of these troops, with the fank of Brigadier-General, in order that he should march them to Detroit. * Hulls Memoirs of the Campaign of 1812, page 15. Governor Hull declined the appointment in the most unqualified manner, stating that it was not his wish to receive any military appointment. Colonel Kingsbury was then ordered to Washington, to take command of these troops, and to receive his instructions to that end. He fell sick on his arrival, and became thus unable to perform the duty. The proposition being again made to Governor Hull, he finally consented to accept any military appointment, .